Slow and Steady

You don’t have to be the fastest. In fact, it may even benefit you to be a slow jogger.

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/02/04/slow-runners-come-out-ahead/

Acupuncture Alleviates Postpartum Depression

As effective as Prozac, without the side effects

http://www.healthcmi.com/Acupuncture-Continuing-Education-News/1411-acupuncture-alleviates-postpartum-depression

Acupuncture, IVF & IUI

Check out our guest post on FitBump!

http://www.fitbump360.com/blog/cat/Sara_Frohlich/post/Acupuncture_And_IVF/

Acupuncture is a fantastic resource for enhancing your fertility, and can be a great complement to modern assisted reproductive techniques like IVF and IUI. You might be wondering how acupuncture can help, when you should come for treatments and if are there any risks or other concerns.

When should I start?

In a nutshell, the sooner the better! Chinese medicine helps your body to function at its most optimal level – and this doesn’t happen overnight. You need to get the field ready before you can plant the crops! Nourishing your body and regulating your cycle can take time, and ideally we would do acupuncture and herbs for a few months before moving on to more serious interventions. Sometimes acupuncture and herbal medicine can do the trick all on their own. As soon as you are planning to conceive, a consultation with your practitioner can help you formulate a plan to get your body ready.

But I am already doing IVF, can it still help?

Yes! Acupuncture has been proven to help your body to respond better to the medications and treatments you are receiving. It can also help moderate the side effects of those drugs, such as bloating, headaches, and mood swings. It can be especially helpful to receive acupuncture during the ovarian stimulation phase in order to encourage the maximum number of follicles (eggs) produced in a cycle. Acupuncture can also help the uterine lining to be healthy and thick to promote implantation. And let’s not forget about stress. Acupuncture can greatly reduce stress which we all know can negatively impact our fertility, our sleep and our immune system.

When should I come in and how often?

Acupuncture is most beneficial when done on a regular basis. A general rule of thumb is once a week, but when you are in the stimulation phase of your cycle it can be helpful to come twice a week. In addition, we have seen studies which show that coming in within 24 hours before and after the embryo transfer can greatly improve success rates. You can read the study for yourself here:

http://www.fertstert.org/article/S0015-0282%2806%2900212-3/abstract

Is it safe? Is there anything I should be worried about?

The great thing about acupuncture is that it is safe and effective and can be used in conjunction with western medicine. We generally do not give Chinese herbs when a patient is already taking medications for an IVF cycle. However, herbs may be prescribed in conjunction with other types of fertility treatments.

How does it work?

From a western perspective acupuncture can increase blood flow to the uterus and ovaries, reduce uterine contractions post embryo transfer (to aid implantation) and calm the nervous system. From a Chinese medicine viewpoint we are nourishing and promoting the flow of Qi and blood. The best part about Chinese medicine is that it takes into account your specific situation and health history. Not all women with fertility issues will have the same Chinese medicine diagnosis. We tailor the treatment to your particular constitution and what is happening in your cycle. We formulate a treatment plan that is unique to you, even when the goal is the same – having a healthy pregnancy!

Get moving, stop sitting, make progress!

This article illustrates how just adding bits of exercise to your routine here and there can seriously impact your health in a positive way. The converse is of course that all that negative behavior can add up too. So avoid getting overwhelmed and start by making smarter decisions one by one – you will see an improvement and be motivated to keep it up – and won’t be tempted to give up so quickly!

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/01/02/the-little-things-add-up-in-fitness/?ref=health

 

Good and Bad, the Little Things Add Up in Fitness

By GRETCHEN REYNOLD

 

The past year in fitness has been alternately inspiring, vexing and diverting, as my revisiting of all of the Phys Ed columns published in 2012 makes clear. Taken as a whole, the latest exercise-related science tells us that the right types and amounts of exercise will almost certainly lengthen your life, strengthen your brain, affect your waistline and even clear debris from inside your body’s cells. But too much exercise, other 2012 science intimates, might have undesirable effects on your heart, while popping painkillers, donning stilettos and sitting and reading this column likewise have their costs.

With New Year’s exercise resolutions still fresh and hopefully unbroken on this, day two of 2013, it now seems like the perfect time to review these and other lessons of the past year in fitness science.

First, since I am habitually both overscheduled and indolent, I was delighted to report, as I did in June, that the “sweet sport” for health benefits seems to come from jogging or moderately working out for only a brief period a few times a week.

Specifically, an encouraging 2012 study of 52,656 American adults found that those who ran 1 to 20 miles per week at an average pace of about 10 or 11 minutes per mile — my leisurely jogging speed, in fact — lived longer, on average, than sedentary adults. They also lived longer than the group (admittedly small) who ran more than 20 miles per week.

“These data certainly support the idea that more running is not needed to produce extra health and mortality benefits,” Dr. Carl J. Lavie, a cardiologist in New Orleans and co-author of the study told me. “If anything,” he said, “it appears that less running is associated with the best protection from mortality risk.”

Similarly, in a study from Denmark that I wrote about in September, a group of pudgy young men lost more weight after 13 weeks of exercising moderately for about 30 minutes several times a week than a separate group who worked out twice as much.

The men who exercised the most, the study authors discovered, also subsequently ate more than the moderate exercisers.

Even more striking, however, the vigorous exercisers subsequently sat around more each day than did the men who had exercised less, motion sensors worn by all of the volunteers showed.

“They were fatigued,” said Mads Rosenkilde, a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Copenhagen and the study’s co-author.

Meanwhile, the men who had worked out for only about 30 minutes seemed to be energized by their new routines. They stood up, walked, stretched and even bounced in place more than they once had. “It looks like they were taking the stairs now, not the elevators, and just moving around more,” Mr. Rosenkilde said. “It was little things, but they add up.”

And that idea was, in fact, perhaps the most dominant exercise-science theme of 2012: that little things add up, with both positive and pernicious effects. Another of my favorite studies of 2012 found that a mere 10 minutes of daily physical activity increased life spans in adults by almost two years, even if the adults remained significantly overweight.

But the inverse of that finding proved to be equally true: not fitting periods of activity into a person’s daily life also affected life span. Perhaps the most chilling sentence that I wrote all year reported that, according to a large study of Western adults, “Every single hour of television watched after the age of 25 reduces the viewer’s life expectancy by 21.8 minutes.”

I am watching much less television these days.

But not all of the new fitness science I covered this year was quite so sobering or, to be honest, consequential. Some of the more practical studies simply validated common sense, including reports that to succeed in ball sports, keep your eye on the ball; during hot-weather exercise, pour cold water over your head; and, finally, on the day before a marathon, eat a lot.

But when I think about the science that has most affected how I plan my life, I return again and again to those studies showing that physical activity alters how long and how well we live. My days of heedless youth are behind me. So I won’t soon forget the study I wrote about in September detailing how moderate, frequent physical activity in midlife can delay the onset of illness and frailty in old age. Exercise won’t prevent you from aging, of course. Only death does that. But this study and others from this year underscore that staying active, even in moderate doses, dramatically improves how your aging body feels and responds.

Aging also inspired my favorite reader comment of 2012, which was posted in response to a research scientist’s name. “‘Dr. Head,’” the reader wrote. “That shall be the name of my all-senior-citizen metal band,” which, if its members gyrate and vigorously bound about like Mick Jagger on his recent tour, should ensure themselves decades in which to robustly perform.

Happy World Breastfeeding Week!

Check out our mention on Stroller Traffic!

Staying Abreast

Local musts for nursing moms

Stroller Traffic

World Breastfeeding Week kicks off today—a perfect time, we thought, to round up New York’s best gear and gurus for nursing moms.

Best lactation consultant: Ayelet Kaznelson approaches nursing from a place of acceptance. She instructs breastfeeding clinics and prenatal classes at Tribeca Parenting, and offers private home visits as well ($250 for the initial session; $200 for follow-ups). 917.620.4068 or ayelet@ayeletkaznelson.com.

Best place to buy everything you need: Yummy Mummy has a well-edited selection of both tried-and-true and technologically advanced gear for breastfeeding moms, as well as nursing clothes that are as stylish as could be expected. Just in: MimiJumi Very Hungry bottles , and Boob “Before & After” tops.

Best convertible nursing bras: Bra Smyth’s seamstresses can convert your regular bras (even the sexy ones) into nursing bras by placing a special hook between the strap and cup. $20-$30 per bra. 2177 Broadway, 212.721.5111 or 905 Madison Ave, 212.772.9400.

Best mini freezers for extra milk: GE’S 5.0 cu. ft. freezer chest will fit comfortably in most New York apartments, and is available from Home Depot for $179 with free delivery. Alternatively, you can troll for rentals at Rent-a-Center.

Best acupuncturist: If the well is running dry, reach out to Juniper Wellness founder Sara Frohlich, who specializes in acupuncture and herbal medicine regimens that boost milk production, clear stagnation, unblock ducts, and ease mastitis. 119 W. 23rd St., suite 802; 917.549.0200 or sara@juniperwellness.com.

Upcoming Events May 13th and 14th

 

 

 

 


Upcoming Events
May 13th Pregnant New Yorker
May 14th C-Section Recovery Workshop
 

 

I hope you are doing well and enjoying the gorgeous spring weather! In the spirit of Mother’s Day, please check out these 2 events at which I will be participating coming up this weekend for moms and moms-to-be.

First, the Pregnant New Yorker expo at Yummy Mummy. Come get some great information for expectant parents.

And if you couldn’t make it to the first one, please join us for a healing circle for women who have had a c-section, led by Madhu Maron.

 

Hope you can make it or please feel free to forward to a friend!

 

Thanks

 

-Sara

pgnyer

Whole Again

A healing circle for women challenged by Cesarean delivery

 

 

Where
Juniper Wellness, 119 West 23rd Street, Suite 802
When
Saturday, May 14 from 10am – 11:30am
Cost
$17
Sign-up
Email or call Madhu at 917 306 1341.  Space is limited to ten participants.

Whether your Cesarean delivery was weeks, months or years ago, you may still feel the after-effects in your body, mind and spirit. You may feel thwarted, silenced, incomplete. Chances are you long to be heard, supported and understood.

 

Join this group of women who were challenged by Cesarean birth and wish to honor and heal the experience. The group will be led by Madhu Maron , a certified life coach and mom who gave birth by C-section in 2009.

 

Our focus will be three-fold:

  • To share our stories in a supportive, safe community
  • To be supported in our loss without apology or judgment
  • To celebrate our strengths and to claim the ways we succeeded in our birth experience

A note from Madhu:

After my C-section, it felt like the world was saying, “You have a healthy baby. Now move on.” I was inspired to create this group after talking to many other women who felt similarly silenced and unable to fully process their loss.

Hope to see you soon!

 

-Sara Frohlich, L.Ac

119 West 23rd Street, Suite 802

(917) 549 0200

sara@juniperwellness.com

www.juniperwellness.com

 

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Whole Again Workshop

Upcoming Workshop

Whole Again: A healing circle for women who were challenged by Cesarean delivery

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

WHOLE AGAIN

Whether your Cesarean delivery was weeks, months or years ago, you may still feel the aftereffects in your body, mind and spirit. You may feel thwarted, silenced, incomplete. Chances are you long to be heard, supported and understood.

Join this group of women who were challenged by Cesarean birth and wish to honor and heal the experience. The group will be led by Madhu Maron, a certified life coach and mom who gave birth by C-section in 2009.

Our focus will be three-fold:

* To share our stories in a supportive, safe community
* To be supported in our loss without apology or judgment
* To celebrate our strengths and to claim the ways we succeeded in our birth experience

Time: Saturday, April 23 from 10:00am – 11:30am

Place: 119 West 23rd Street, Suite 802, NYC

Cost: $17

To register, contact Madhu Maron at 917 306 1341 or madhu@madhucoach.com

A note from Madhu: After my C-section, it felt like the world was saying, “You have a healthy baby. Now move on.” I was inspired to create this group after talking to many other women who felt similarly silenced and unable to fully process their loss.

Happy Year of the Rabbit!

The year of the rabbit begins on February 3rd, 2011. Those born under the sign of the rabbit are known for  their calm and gentle nature, but also persistence. Rabbits are considered to be dependable and give good advice. They are cautious and like to carefully consider their options before making a move. They are also known to be warm, artistic and affectionate.  Rabbits are intuitive and are quick to react to potentially harmful situations.

Having many traits of its namesake animal, most Rabbit years are quiet, positive and inspiring. 2011 should be a major change after the fast paced and dramatic Year of the Tiger. Family, diplomacy and personal development will all be highlighted in 2011. Arts and culture will be thriving. Love, romance and family life are key, with a renewed appreciation of loved ones and friends. Overall, it should be a fun and relatively peaceful year. The Chinese Rabbit year favors peaceful solutions and diplomacy, so even if there are still rough times, there will be a feeling of hope and an optimistic outlook for the future.

Being Healthy at 100

Check out this article on how simple lifestyle changes can have a great positive impact on your health. And it’s never too late to start. Some suggestions are as simple as walking. Little things really do make a difference!

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/26/health/26brody.html?src=me&ref=health